Video Instructions for your Homebrew Sake

Video Instructions for your Homebrew Sake

Well, I have just finished pulling everything together for a Video Series to intertwine with the step by step outline I posted back on September 12th. It was a lot more work than I expected. In the end I finally just said this is good enough and getting it out is more important than making it better.

The video series consists of 22 videos that run from creating the moto to bottling the Sake. Every step is documented so you can see that there is no magic here; anyone can do it. You can do it!

It is now clearly sake brewing season as we enter November and the nights are becoming colder and colder. There is no better time to try your hand, just take a breath, and do it.

Kanpai!

Protecting your HomeBrew Sake from light

Protecting your HomeBrew Sake from light

Sake, as with other beers, is sensitive to light and in particular ultraviolet light. Sunlight is the greatest offender having a much higher degree of ultraviolet light than most other sources. This is not to say that other sources are harmless, they can have a negative impact as well. Given that sake can be harmed by this light and light is all around us, what can we do to keep our sake safe from this harm?

We can choose to use bottles that have the best properties for filtering the light and specifically the ultraviolet light. Fortunately for us, Bradley E. Sturgeon, PhD1 recently did a study that examined which colors of glass bottles provide the best light filtering. Continue reading “Protecting your HomeBrew Sake from light”

  1. Bradley E. Sturgeon Supplemental paper to Basic Brewing Episode Airing April 10th 2008 is here

US Sake Brewers (Part 1 – Sake Breweries)

US Sake Brewers (Part 1 – Sake Breweries)

I thought that it might be interesting to look at Sake breweries outside of Japan. In many ways I think those inside Japan are more interesting but they cannot be fully cataloged in a humble site like this. A much smaller task, and one that can be accomplished here, is that of cataloging sake breweries outside Japan. Starting with the US, I will work through the breweries with a little information on each.

Honolulu Sake Brewery and Ice Co., Ltd:

I would like to start with the Honolulu Sake Brewery and Ice Co., Ltd. While not the first Sake brewery in the US, or even in operation, it is one of the most notable. Honolulu Sake Brewery was established in 1908 and survived through prohibition and the US shutdown of sake brewing during WW2 until the end of 1992.  It survived these gaps in production by making ice during prohibition and soy sauce around the end of WW2. Continue reading “US Sake Brewers (Part 1 – Sake Breweries)”

Difference between sokujo moto and previous methods

Difference between sokujo moto and previous methods.

As I am thinking about some experiments to do with sake I began thinking about the difference between various moto methods. Not so much the procedures but what makes the sake different. Most homebrew sake is made with either the sokujo or yamahai methods. The yamahai method, much like the kimoto method is known for producing a deeper and richer, even earthier sake.

In the sokujo method lactic acid is added at the start of the moto while in the yamahai method various bugs are rallied to provide the lactic acid. It is this early stage of the moto that makes the difference in outcome. Once the bugs have done there thing and there is enough lactic acid built up the moto is protected from any further trouble and the yeast are free to thrive and grow. Continue reading “Difference between sokujo moto and previous methods”

A Pictorial Look at the TwinBird Rice Mill

A Pictorial Look at the TwinBird Rice Mill

Back in August I posted an article about milling rice with the TwinBird Rice Mill. However, I was not able to include any pictures that could prove useful to those of a mind to construct their own mill. I committed to doing so and I now have the needed pictures.

As we shall see this arrangement seems like it can point the way to a very workable small rice mill that would handle, say, 20 lbs. of rice. Anyway, let’s take a close look at this baby. The TwinBrid mill is designed to run in the kitchens of Japan, handles 4 go (180ml) of rice at a time and runs on 100 Volts, 150Watts at 50-60 cycles. This makes it a good fit for US kitchens as well. The picture below shows the mill and its control panel. The left side is used to indicate the starting state of the rice to be milled, from white rice at the top to brown rice at the bottom. The right side is used to indicate the level of milling desired. Given this, I believe the setting shown gives the longest mill time setting.

TwinBird Mill
TwinBird Mill

Continue reading “A Pictorial Look at the TwinBird Rice Mill”