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For the most part the Forum is still to be implemented. Until we have the real thing in place we can used the comments here in lieu of an actual forum.

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300 thoughts on “Forum”

  1. Hi Will,

    I’ve been traveling to Japan for years and brewing my own beer for sometime now. I actually study early human-crop relations in Japan (Paleoethnobotany) which is why I have been to Japan so much, so it seems inevitable that I would make the jump from beer to Sake. I just picked up your book!

    I have only one major hurdle: Rice. I live in Northern Canada and rice is a commodity here and there is little selection. I can order some of the variants with high shinpaku online, but I assume they will all need to be milled down a little to 60% (I want to make Ginjo or DaiGinjo grade). I am hoping to avoid going the TwinBird route for now, and your book gave the impression that 60% milled rice is a pretty normal thing and easy to find. Could you point me to some specific examples/sources? I am having trouble finding the polish percentage ever specified.

    I considered just ordering straight from the site here but the shipping is a bit extreme for my location.

    Thanks!
    Tyler

    1. Tyler, Hi,

      In terms of rice milled for sake and small (homebrew size) batches the only places I know for you to get rice is here and Minnesota Rice and Milling.

      Short or medium grain table or sushi rice will work well. Generally they are milled to about 93% so you can’t use them to make Ginjo but they can still make fine sake.

      As for the twinbird personal rice mill, for me it is just not practical. The batch size is too small to be useful.

      Thanks,
      Will

  2. Will,
    Having problems measuring SG. I am at day 34 so should be ready for pressing. However there still seems to be a good deal if bubbling going on. Should I go ahead and press or wait until the fermentation stops.
    Thanks

    1. Hey Scott,
      Waiting for no activity will give you the driest possible sake. Taste it to see what you think of it now. It will seem a little sweeter than it does after pressing but close. If it is too sweet let it ferment. If it is getting too dry for you or is just right, go ahead and press.
      Thanks,
      Will

      1. Thanks Will. I think I waited a little too long. It’s really dry. Can I sweeten it up ? If so how and when? I pressed it today

  3. Hi Will,
    Does your sake end up clear, and if so how. Mine is always yellow. Bentonite does not seem to take the yellow color out. I have been trying to figure out how to use charcoal but have not seen a home brew friendly application.

    1. Hey Scott,
      The yellowish tint is normal. I have not tried to remove this.

      You could look at the charcoal mixture used for home distilling or some of the post distilling filters. You could even try the brita water filter.
      Thanks,
      Will

  4. Hi Will, I am trying my hand at making some Sake and following a recipe from the internet. I have used Japanese rice and a slap pack of Koji and yeast. The fermetation seemed to go well the only thing I’m not sure of is the smell of the Kasu, should it have a strong cheese aroma? or is there something wrong?

    Regards,

    Ron.
    Exeter, UK.

    1. Hey Ron, Hi,
      I know of no slap pack koji product, can you say more of what this is?
      I would not expect a cheesy aroma, this sounds like there may be a bacterial infection.
      Thanks,
      Will

      1. Hi Will,
        Thanks for the reply.
        This was the product I used:
        Wyeast ™ 4134 Sake Yeast

        Sake #9 used in conjunction with Koji for making wide variety of Asian Jius (rice based beverages). Full bodied profile, silky and smooth on palate with low ester production.

        Flocculation: Low
        Attenuation: NA
        Temperature Range: 60-75°F, 15-24°C
        Alcohol Tolerance: 14% ABV

        1. Thanks Ron,

          OK, so I may have misunderstood, but that is only sake yeast and does not include koji. Were you using that for both the yeast and koji? If so, that explains some of what happened. The koji is needed to convert the starches in the rice to sugar for the yeast to convert to alcohol. Koji is a mold covered rice and it is the mold that makes the enzymes needed to do the conversion.

          Thanks,
          Will

          1. Hi Will,

            Yep, my mistake, I read about it on another website and took the information as read, which was wrong!!! So now looks like I have a very cheesey fermented rice rather than Sake. I think I’ll start again!!!

  5. G’day Will,

    Quick question on the water chemistry for the Sokujo-moto. Can’t find Morton Salt Sub so I have pure KCl to use instead but don’t know the percentage of KCl in the Morton product. Should I adjust the amount of pure KCl or just use a teaspoon?

    Cheers.

    1. Hey Steve,

      KCl is 52% potassium while Morton salt substitute is just over 50.8%. For our purposes these two are just about the same. So you can use the same amount of either one that you have.

      Thanks,
      Will

      1. Thanks for your help so far Will, all seems to be coming along well now.

        I’m up to the pressing stage and was considering the Honjozo addition but wondered if that would kill the yeast and prevent any secondary fermentation, or can I expect the yeast to survive? I plan to press just 12 hours after adding the alcohol.

        Thanks again,
        Steve.

        1. You are welcome.

          Adding the alcohol will at least slow the yeast’s productivity if not kill them but that should not be a problem if you are planning to press shortly thereafter.

          Thanks,
          Will

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